Northamptonshire Battlefields Society Speakers Programme 2019

All talks start at 7:30pm unless otherwise stated
Venue: Delapre Golf Centre, Eagle Drive, Northampton
Members: Free, Non- Members £7.50

31 January  – The French, Richard III and the battle of Bosworth.  Mike Ingram.

Mike is the Society’s Chair, a medieval historian, author of “The Battle of Bosworth” battlefield guide and local expert on The Wars of the Roses.

28 February – 1469 – that turbulent year.  Phil Steele.

Phil is the Society’s Vice Chair and a trustee of the Battlefields Trust.  He is leading the Society’s project to mark the 550th anniversary of the battle of Edgcote and the year of troubles.

28 March – King Richard III. Matthew Lewis.

Historical writer Matthew Lewis returns to offer his unique perspectives on one of our most written about and controversial monarchs.

25 April – The SOE and Northamptonshire.  John Bassett. 

John worked for the Foreign Office for over a decade and is a leading expert in cyber security.  He has had a life-long interest in covert operations.

30 May – The Battle of Towton.  Chris Berendt.

Chris is Towton Battlefield Society’s Chair, and a passionate advocate of spreading the word about the importance of our medieval battlefield heritage.

27 June – The Organisation of a Late Medieval Army.  Mike Ingram.

Mike is the Society’s Chair, a medieval historian, author of “The Battle of Northampton”  the definitive account of the battle and local expert on The Wars of the Roses.

25 July – Warwick the Kingmaker.  Prof Michael Hicks.

Michael Hicks is Professor Emeritus in Medieval History at the University of Winchester.  He has written many books on the late medieval period including on Richard III and on the Earl of Warwick.

August No talk

26 September – English Fashion and the Art of the 1470s. Jazz Caruana.

Jazz Caruana of the Barnet Battlefields Society is an expert in medieval clothing and fashions and the associated legal constraints.  The presentation will include replica period clothing.

31 Oct – AGM & talk (NB 7:00pm start) Peterborough Cathedral and the Magna Carta.  Dr Jonathan Foyle

Dr Foyle is a well known TV presenter and passionate advocate for our architectural heritage  He is also Visiting Professor in Conservation at the University of Lincoln.

28 November – How to become King in Medieval England.  Graham Evans.

The Society Secretary and Editor of the Wild Rat explores what it took to become king between the Conquest and Bosworth and draws some surprising conclusions.

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All information is correct at the time of publication but may be subject to changes.  Please keep in touch with the Society through our page on Facebook for the latest updates and news.

Northamptonshire Battlefields Society Speakers Programme 2018

All talks start at 7:30pm unless otherwise stated
Venue: Delapre Golf Centre, Eagle Drive, Northampton
Members: Free, Non- Members £5

25 January  – Overmighty Subjects: Factions and Feuds in the Wars of the Roses. Mike Ingram

Mike is the Society’s Chairman, a medieval historian, author of “The Battle of Northampton” the definitive account of the battle and local expert on The Wars of the
Roses.

22 February – The Georgian Militia. Prof Matthew McCormack

Professor McCormack is an expert on the militia of the Georgian period. An absolute
must for anyone fascinated by those dashing chaps in Jane Austen’s novels.

29 March – The Black Prince. Dr Michael Jones

Dr Jones is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a member of the British
Commission for Military History and a noted historical writer.

26 April – The Princes in the Tower. Mathew Lewis 

Historical writer Matthew Lewis returns to discuss one of histories most controversial mysteries.

31 May – Uncovering Edgcote: Re-evaluating the evidence. Phil Steele with Graham Evans

Phil is the Society’s Vice Chair, and is leading the project to mark the 550th anniversary of the Battle of Edgcote in 2019.

28 June – Forging Identities: Heraldry. Dr Conny Bailey

Dr Bailey lectures in Art History at the University of Leicester, and has previously given talks at Northampton Museum.

26 July – The Man who Arrested the Earl: William Boteler Northamptonshire’s Swordsman. Graham Evans.

The editor of the Wild Rat discusses the life and times of the man who was
Northamptonshire’s military governor after the Civil War.

August No talk

27 September – Eleanor of Castile: The Shadow Queen. Sara Cockerill

Sara is a historian and barrister who has written the only full length biography of Edward I’s beloved queen, and the woman after whom our Eleanor Cross is named.

25 Oct – AGM & talk (NB 7:00pm start) Agincourt past, present and future. Professor Anne Curry

Professor Anne Curry is the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at the University of
Southampton. She is a Medieval Historian and the foremost expert on the Battle of
Agincourt. She was the Chair of the Trustees of the very successful Agincourt 600 Project. She is also a Trustee of the Battlefields Trust, and also the Royal Armouries.
The 600th anniversary of Agincourt in 2015 provided an opportunity to reflect on the
battle. But what more is there to know? Where next for studies of this iconic battle?
Professor Curry shares her views on this nation-defining battle.

Archives latest news

After a short sharp fight NCC have partially climbed down over the archive. However, the battle is not over it seems. Please see the below statement released today.

STATEMENT: NORTHAMPTONSHIRE ARCHIVES & HERITAGE SERVICE

Northamptonshire County Council has reviewed its decision to change opening hours at its archives and heritage service after listening to the views of its regular users and supporters.

The archives service will now be open for free access on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9am to 1pm and 2pm to 5pm and the first Saturday in each month, 9am to 1pm.

In light of financial pressures and reducing visitor numbers, there will be a review of the service ahead of the next financial year as part of the budget setting process and this will include a full consultation around any proposed changes.

In 2016, the service was visited by a total of 3,500 researchers, a drop of 50 per cent compared with 2006.

County council cabinet member for public protection, strategic infrastructure and economic growth Cllr André Gonzalez de Savage said: “Having listened to the views of our service users here in Northamptonshire and across the UK, a decision has been made to reconsider the proposed changes to opening hours.

“However, given our significant financial challenges, changes to customer behaviour and a growth in online enquiries, we need to consider how best to use our limited resources and will be reviewing the service in the coming months as part of the annual budget process.

“As part of this there will be a full public consultation in which service users will be able to provide their feedback ahead of any changes being implemented.”

They have only gone and done it again mum!

 

Oh dear. Here we go again. Northants is once again doing its best to become philistine of the year. Yup the county that wanted to dig its battlefield up, brought you the Sekhemka debacle, and allowed one of the last surviving Queen Eleanor’s Crosses to crumble, is now attempting to price a visit to the local archives out of the market. This in effect stops anyone carrying out research into the town and counties amazing past (the archive is for both town and county, but run by the county). This is the county of spires, squires, kings and queens where national and international history was made. It was home to radicals from lollards to puritans, home and burial place of ‘founder of the Brownists and originator of the gunpowder plot. Amongst many others, it is the burial place of Napoleon’ s granddaughter and the inventor of the sandwich. And democracy was fought for in its fields many times! And that is just scratching the surface. Who knows what is there still waiting to be discovered. Are they really intent on making the town’s and counties history mere history?

To be fair, this time it is not the borough but the county council. However, the archive is in the middle of the town so both will no doubt, be tarred with same brush.

Over recent months there has been an awakening of the powers that be with the importance of the town’s and counties history and there have been serious attempts to raise the awareness of it locally and nationally, but in one foul swoop it has come crashing down to joke status again. The county sat on those meetings and went to events publically pronouncing the plans, so knew full well what was being admirably attempted, so why have they brought it all crashing down without consultation? No neither do I?

Perhaps it is a misguided attempt to cash in on the awakening?

For those of you who have not undertaken archival research before let me explain a typical process. You arrive at the archive and request the documents. Hopefully you have identified the correct file in which the information you are looking for is held. Sometimes there can be a number of different files in which the information may be found and you then you are typically restricted to three files at a time. You then have to wait for them to be found. Providing they have been put away from the last time they were viewed and not languishing on a trolley somewhere (that is assuming it has been catalogued and indexed correctly in the first place), and depending how busy the archive is, and how many staff are there, you should have the file within the hour, hopefully quicker, although it can be longer). These files are often little more than a collection of papers maps or rolls usually without indexes. It really is a case of trying find a needle in a pile of needles. This is a long and slow process. It can be much longer if it is not in modern English or before spelling was standardised or the writing is illegible. And even longer if in medieval Latin, French or Italian etc. So this might take several hours to complete.

You might not find what you are looking for, so you have to start the whole process again. And even then you might not find anything and have to go through the process several more times. I have spent a whole week at Kew researching one thing. On another occasion I spent two days going through the Astor Archive looking for evidence of an event but left empty handed. Kew of course is free but with the new system at Northampton, even a day is costing me serious money and a week? I will let you do the maths at £31.50 per hour. Yet there is still no guarantee that I will have found what I want. Speculative visits would of course be prohibitive under this new system.

The text then has to transcribed or copied (incurring additional costs).

You should now be able to see the problem! Contrary to popular belief writing history books pays little. You already have to pay a small fortune for images from recognised sources. So this puts any original research into the counties history out of financial reach especially if the intention is to write a paper, book or article. Instead people will be forced to rehash old accounts (some of dubious accuracy) and use less reliable sources. Or, and more likely, just ignore Northants contribution to history all together. This proposal will therefore be the death of historical originality and discovery. An immediate rethink is needed!

Here is a link to the petition, which at the time of writing had over 3,000 signatories.

https://www.change.org/p/northamptonshire-county-council-northamptonshire-county-council-don-t-charge-for-visiting-archives?source_location=petition_nav

Battle of Edgcote Anniversary Walk

Edgecote is another of Northamptonshires forgotten battlefields. This one marked the beginning of the second stage of the Wars of the Roses – Warwick’s rebellion and according to legend, decided by a Banbury barmaid. The Yorkist forces were slaughtered including 152 Welsh nobles. Their leader William Herbert, earl of Pembroke, captured and executed at Northampton’s Queen Eleanor Cross whilst Warwick and Edward’s brother Clarence looked on

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Date: 26 July 2017

Where: The Griffin Inn, Chipping Warden

Time: 7:30pm

Battle of Northampton Event 15/16 July 2017

The international award winning Northamptonshire Battlefield Society will be at Delapre Abbey on 15/16 July for the commemoration of the 1460 battle where we will be giving walks, talks and demonstrations. Come and play our new battle of Northampton game. We will have our new Northamptonshire and Rutland Wars of the Roses Gazetteer and battle heraldry posters on sale as well as the book and game.

delapre poster 2017

 

 

Change of Speaker 29 June 2017

Due to circumstances beyond our control, we have a new speaker and talk for our next talk on 29 June. It will now be Rob Atkins from MOLA talking about Iron Age Northants. Rob has been a post-excavation manager at MOLA’s Northampton office since March 2016 and is employed to write up and publish backlog sites as well as help colleagues in report writing. Rob graduated from Birmingham University in 1989 with a BSocSc in Economic and Social History. He worked for various archaeological units before being employed by MOLA in 1993 as a site assistant and later as a supervisor. In 2002 he briefly left MOLA to be a project officer with the old Cambridgeshire County Council unit (now OA East) before returning in his current role. Rob has always been very interested in the post-excavation side of archaeology and has authored or co-authored various monographs and articles in local and national journals over the last 15 or so years.

Battle of Northampton Memorial Walk 10 July 7:00pm

All welcome. Meet at Delapre Abbey at 7:00pm to walk to Queen Eleanor Cross to lay flowers for the fallen of Northamptonshires medieval battles. Will include a mini tour and talk on the 1460 battle.DSCF9513